Govt Of India Sends Notices To Xiaomi, Oppo, OnePlus, Vivo; Find Out Why?


Another notice is expected which would require testing of the companies’ devices.

Popular Chinese smartphone brands have been sent notices by the Indian government.

They are required to provide details on the data and components used in the devices.

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Why?

The brands in question, Vivo, Oppo, Xiaomi and OnePlus, collectively dominate over half of the Indian smartphone market.

The government will conduct research to determine whether the smartphones sold by the companies are safe for Indian users.

Another notice is expected which would require testing of the companies’ devices.

In Retaliation?

The move intensifies scrutiny on Chinese companies after investments promised to the government by them were not fulfilled.

After India cracked down on Chinese apps last year, Chinese smartphone brands appealed to Indian consumers through marketing and increased local production and investments.

Oppo, Vivo and its sub-brand iQoo had the biggest share of investment proposals that were not pushed through.

But it is unclear why Xiaomi is caught up in this since it has made good on its promises so far. 

Pre-Installed Apps And Snooping Concerns

The notice by the government is aligned with its investigation into components used by Chinese telecom companies such as Huawei and ZTE.

Apart from hardware, software details, especially pre-installed apps on Chinese smartphones may also be probed.

They will be inspected for concerns regarding cybersecurity and snooping on Indian citizens.

Questions being asked include why certain apps come pre installed and whether they share certain information.

Censorship Capabilities

Xiaomi Corp’s flagship phones marketed in Europe were said to have built-in censorship capabilities.

It could potentially detect and block terms like “Free Tibet,” “Long live Taiwan independence,” and “democracy movement,” according to Lithuania’s state-run cybersecurity commission.


Reportedly, the concerned companies are “in panic” since there is little information as to how the whole thing will pan out and if there will be future repercussions.

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